Going For A Song: ‘Closure’

Mammoth Penguins – Closure

It’s thanks to the Norman Records’ weekly playlist I heard Mammoth Penguins this week. ‘Closure’ is the first song on their new album, There’s No Fight We Can’t Both Win. I listened to it (the album – sub 45 minutes, the perfect length for an album of alt indie pop rock – their classification, not mine) a little worried, concerned the rest of the album wouldn’t match up to that opening.  But it does. The album is melodic, noisy, recorded fantastically, with intelligent lyrics (and if you’re wondering what I mean by “intelligent”, I mean ‘I love you, I love you, I love you, I love you, I love you, fuck it all, fuck it all, fuck it all’). They’re playing London in June. I’m there.

Going For A Song: ‘Song For Willie’

Magnolia Electric Co. – Song For Willie

I recently finished reading Erin Osmon’s book Jason Molina: Riding With the Ghost. There’s a lot to recommend it: details such as Jason’s teenage bands having reassuringly teenage band names (Chronic Insanity anyone?), my hope fulfilled the book would look at the Midwest music scene (subject for Osmon’s next book maybe please?), and the excellent analysis of Jason’s music throughout.

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Going For A Song: ‘Slow Education’

Silver Jews – Slow Education

When God was young / He made the wind and the sun / And since then it’s been a slow education / And you’ve got that one idea again / The one about dying

I loved the Silver Jews. ‘Slow Education’ is the first song on the first album – Bright Flight (2001) – I ever heard of theirs. So enamoured of the band was I, I stuck a review of the album, which I had cut out of a music magazine, onto my bedroom wall like a soldier, posted overseas, would do to a photo of his sweetheart back home.

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Going For A Song: ‘Didn’t Know What I Was in For’

Better Oblivion Community Centre – Didn’t Know What I Was in For

Apart from the music he has put out under his own name – and contrary to the label of singer-songwriter he is frequently ascribed – Conor Oberst is primarily a collaborator. All his bands – Commander Venus, Bright Eyes, Desaparecidos, Mystic Valley Band, and Monsters of Folk – have been bands. And Oberst’s latest one is the Better Oblivion Community Centre, a collaboration with Phoebe Bridgers. I haven’t heard all of their debut record, but I’ve heard some of it and I like what I’ve heard so far.

 

 

Going For A Song: ‘Elephant’

Jason Isbell – Elephant

Jason Isbell is someone who I’d heard of through his association with the Drive-By Truckers, but had never heard any music by him. Then last year I heard his song ‘Live Oak’, which led me to the album Southeastern (2013). ‘Elephant’, like ‘Live Oak’, is a good indication of Southeastern as a whole: affective, never sentimental, crafted songs, which use country music as a touchstone.

Going For A Song: ‘Always Up’

Low – Always Up

My younger self would lament the fact, but due to the way I now find out about and then listen to music, new albums take their time to filter through to me, and I’m usually a year behind in my listening. This meant, when I started thinking about what albums I most enjoyed this year, I found the majority were pre-2018.

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