Going For A Song: ‘Keep Your Name’

Dirty Projectors – Keep Your Name

I love this song as much as I loved ‘Cool Your Heart’ when I first heard it. But I’m struggling with the Dirty Projectors new eponymously titled album. It’s just the kinda cold nature of the production on these two songs which attracts me to them I struggle with over the course of a whole album. We’ll see…

Going For A Song: ‘Summerwind’

Bottomless Pit – Summerwind

Sometimes I realise there’s a band, or a musician, I’ve haven’t included on Going For A Song yet and I think, Paul, you really should have done so by now, put that right. And so I do.

This is Bottomless Pit, who I discovered a few years back thanks to Douglas Cowie and his Song of the Week blog post:

These guys are making rock music of real heart and real beauty and real intelligence, but also rock music that really rocks. Go! Buy this music!

I did. I recommend you do to.

Going For A Song: ‘Cool Your Heart’

Dirty Projectors – Cool Your Heart

Anybody can sing about being happy in love. A great love song is not actually singing about being happy, they’re not the ones that sell. The biggest sellers are torch songs […] Even for people that are in happy relationships, there is something about these kinds of songs that produces longing. It’s melancholic. It produces something unique in the human psyche that touches us. We all long for something, we don’t know what it is, and this kind of music produces that. It’s not because it’s sad music either. People are happy in this particular feeling for some reason – Robin Gibb, The Bee Gees

All love songs must contain denude. For the love song is never truly happy – Nick Cave, Love Song Lecture

“Wanna be where you are / you’re the right one” – Dirty Projectors, ‘Cool Your Heart’

 

A Joke Endures

I’ve just finished reading volumes III and IV of Tristram Shandy. Towards the end of volume IV there’s a part about Grandmothers:

20170422_164454

Forward 256 years, to Series 9 Episode 6 of Jerry Seinfeld’s Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee, Bob Einstein tells a similar joke (around 12m05s).

Isn’t that great. For a joke to be able to survive that long there’s something to be said, I think, about the joke, about comedy, about us, etc. etc.