Going For A Song: ‘Under the Plastic and NCT’

Sleaford Mods – Under the Plastic and NCT

Ryvita / Ryvita / Cracked Black Pepper

This is how it starts. A love song.

Here / Here’s a bit of cheese / Nibble the bastard

A great one. A love song.

Under the general weight of it all / exists impossible visions of you

 

 

Going For A Song: ‘For What Is Chatteris…’

Half Man Half Biscuit – For What Is Chatteris…

In the Quietus, Taylor Parkes calls ‘For What Is Chatteris…’ a ‘beautifully low-key tragedy, a modern “leaving town” ballad with a lyric of stunning economy and grace’. This is not hyperbole. It’s a love song of subtleness. It places the love song at the heart of a panegyric for one of the four market towns in the Fenland district of Cambridgeshire, England; and by doing so the panegyric is questioned – are the attributes it lists really the be all and all? The tragedy then becomes – though still low-key – all the more felt for being submerged.

Going For A Song: ‘Cool Your Heart’

Dirty Projectors – Cool Your Heart

Anybody can sing about being happy in love. A great love song is not actually singing about being happy, they’re not the ones that sell. The biggest sellers are torch songs […] Even for people that are in happy relationships, there is something about these kinds of songs that produces longing. It’s melancholic. It produces something unique in the human psyche that touches us. We all long for something, we don’t know what it is, and this kind of music produces that. It’s not because it’s sad music either. People are happy in this particular feeling for some reason – Robin Gibb, The Bee Gees

All love songs must contain denude. For the love song is never truly happy – Nick Cave, Love Song Lecture

“Wanna be where you are / you’re the right one” – Dirty Projectors, ‘Cool Your Heart’